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We enhance individual and organizational performance through the application of Personality Theories.

Group Exercises

The Apple Exercise

Mar 14th, 2012

The Apple Exercise

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This exercise can be conducted with an individual or with a group.  While this exercise can be conducted with objects other than apples, apples were the objects we chose to use as we started working with the eight function-attitudes. 

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Setup:  When using with a group, please divide the members into small groups of four to five people.  Give each person at least one apple. Inform everyone that the apple will be used for eight different exercises, so they should not bite the apple. When working with a group, we recommend that you have each person respond individually except for numbers 3 and 5.  The others are conducive to having the group work together to create a response.

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Time: 30-60 minutes

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This is a Se exercise.

1.   Instruct everyone to examine the apple through all of their senses other than taste.  It is helpful if you have an apple and model the behavior for them.  Turn the apple around in your hands as you vocalize the different specks, dimples, and changes in color you are observing in your apple.  Verbalize how it feels –slick, sticky, waxy, etc.  Thump on it to hear how it sounds.  Smell the apple and note the scent.  Ask everyone to reflect on whether or not they tend to be very aware of their physical environment. 

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This is a Si exercise.

2.   Instruct everyone to now relive a previous experience they have had that involved an apple or apples.  An adaptation would be to have everyone mix the apples up on a table then find their apple by recognizing it from the characteristics they observed in the previous exercise.  Ask everyone to reflect on whether or not they had any trouble reliving a previous experience and if they did not, what was the reliving experience like. If you had them try to recognize their apple using the characteristics they had observed, ask them what was that experience like and how sure are they that they have their original apple. 

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This is a Ne exercise.

3.   Instruct everyone to examine their apple searching for patterns on the surface of their apple.  After they have had a short period of time to identify any patterns, ask them to brainstorm about possible new uses for the apples.  Ask everyone to reflect on whether or not they found it strange to be searching for patterns and possibilities.

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This is a Ni exercise.

4.   Have everyone close their eyes and reflect on what the apple might symbolize for them or what insight comes to mind as they reflect on the apple. 

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      Ni is the one function-attitude that we cannot just call into action.  It comes on its own accord, so people might not have received what it might symbolize nor have an insight.  Please try to engage Ni yourself, and lead the sharing of what came to mind by sharing your own.

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      This is a Te exercise.

5.   Instruct everyone to organize their apples using objective criteria. Have each group look at how the other groups organized their apples.  Point out that when Te is used to organize things others can see an organizational structure.

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      This is a Ti exercise.

6.   Instruct everyone to define their objects in the broadest possible way, then, in sequence, make the definitions more precise.  For example, one might start with fruit while another starts with food, and a third starts with training aid.  After a few minutes, ask everyone to share the categories they used. 

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      This is an Fe exercise.

7.   Instruct everyone to think of ways the apples could be used to strengthen relationships.  After a few minutes ask them to share the different ways they might use the apples to strengthen relationships.

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      This is an Fi exercise.

8.   Have everyone identify how the apple represents a personal value, or symbolizes what is really important.  Ask them to share how the apple represents what is important to them. 

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Processing:  While there is processing of the answers to each question, this exercise is a great exercise to help people identify their preferred perceiving and judging function-attitudes which can then be converted into a type code.  To do this, ask everyone to reflect on the first four exercises and identify the one that was the most natural or comfortable, and then repeat this with the second four exercises.

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The exercise can also be used to show that we can use all eight of Jung’s function-attitudes.  Point out which functions were being used in each exercise.  Ask everyone to record the ease and difficulty they have with each step.  You can use their responses to discuss type development and the conscious and unconscious nature of the functions.

 
Want to learn more about the Eight Function Attitudes?  Learn more</?xml:namespace>


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